Friday, October 28, 2011

Tatterdemalion

Definition: (from dictionary.com)
-noun
1. a person in tattered clothing; a shabby person

Examples:
"After enjoying a delicious dinner of brains, the zombie wandered around looking like a tatterdemalion."
"Just because you sleep in a coffin doesn't mean you get to be a tatterdemalion."

Origin: (from etymonline.com)
"'ragged child, person dressed in old clothes,' c.1600, probably from tatter (n.), with fantastic second element, but perhaps also suggested by Tartar, with a contemporary sense of 'vagabond, gypsy.'"

Awkwardness rating: 8

Maybe I want to be a fashionable zombie and not a tatterdemalion. (123rf.com)

Tuesday, October 18, 2011

Nincompoop

Definition: (from dictionary.com)
-noun
1. a fool or simpleton

Examples:
"You actually believed me when I said that unicorns exist? You're not gullible; you're a nincompoop."
"She is a nincompoop. She takes blonde to a whole other level."

Origin: (from etymonline.com)
"1670s, nicompoop. Despite similarity [noted by Johnson] to Latin legal phrase non compos mentis 'insane, mentally incompetent' (c.1600), the connection is denied by etymologists because the earliest forms lack the second -n-. Weekley thinks first element may be a proper name, and cites Nicodemus, which he says was used in French for 'a fool,' or Nicholas. Klein says probably an invented word."

Awkwardness rating: 9

Unicorns: a nincompoop's fantasy pet. (bingebehavior.com)

Monday, October 3, 2011

Pouf

Definition: (from dictionary.com)
-noun
1. a high headdress with the hair rolled in puffs, worn by women in the late 18th century
2. an arrangement of the hair over a pad; puff
3. a puff of material as an ornament on a dress or headdress

Examples:
"I think Snooki wears her hair in a pouf so she looks taller."
"The word 'pouf' was originally in reference to over-stuffed cushions, but I think today it corresponds better to the offer-stuffed egos of the people who wear their hair that way."

Origin: (from etymonline.com)
"'styles of elaborate female head-dress,' 1817 (in ref. to styles of c.1780), from French bouffer 'to blow out, puff,' probably of imitative origin. As a fashion in dress-making, recorded from 1869; in reference to over-stuffed cushions, 1884. As a verb by 1882 (implied in pouffed)."

Awkwardness rating: 4

The signature Snooki pouf. (haironthebrain.com)